Reference art

  

„Mezzotint Photos“ – Gläsernes Depot – Albertinum – Dresden – Photo # 1, Stéphane Couturier, 2012/13, Ilfoflex Print/Diasec, Courtesy: Galerie Polaris, Paris; Galerie Kornfeld, Berlin
„Mezzotint Photos“ – Gläsernes Depot – Albertinum – Dresden – Photo # 1, Stéphane Couturier, 2012/13, Ilfoflex Print/Diasec, Courtesy: Galerie Polaris, Paris; Galerie Kornfeld, BerlinKlicken um Bild zu vergrößern

StĂ©phane Couturier  

The photographs by French artist Stéphane Couturier are mostly pictures in which his choice of motif focuses on situations of high-density information. This was also the impression characterising his visit to the Dresden Sculpture Collection. The study depots with their wealth of objects were practically pictures in themselves for Couturier and gave him the impulse to develop a new group of works for “de sculptura”. At first glance the selected photos seem like black areas out of which the objects only emerge gradually, like shadows. The artist sees the optical impression also as an approach to the historical process of the daguerreotype. He is intrigued how objects crop up out of darkness, appear and disappear again. With his work Couturier also wishes to query the picture per se: is it a “real” photograph, a manipulation of reality, or a reconstructed reality? By withdrawing the sculptures into the black area, he makes the difference between the visible and the invisible manifest as a theme.

Display 1 / Torso 1 (Herakles — Hm 093), Gläsernes Depot, Katharina Gaenssler, 2013, installation with 3.178 photos, Courtesy: Barbara Gross Galerie, Munich
Display 1 / Torso 1 (Herakles — Hm 093), Gläsernes Depot, Katharina Gaenssler, 2013, installation with 3.178 photos, Courtesy: Barbara Gross Galerie, MunichKlicken um Bild zu vergrößern

Katharina Gaenssler

The two installations by Katharina Gaenssler give us a visual image of selected spatial situations in the Sculpture Collection in Dresden. She did her practical work in the “Gläserne Depot” (Glass Depot) and in the “Schaudepot von Barock bis Gegenwart” (Study Depot from the Baroque to the Present). The starting point of her project consists of a large number of individual photographs, which she assembles like pixels into a picture. Corresponding to the additive principle of the installation, each photo is pasted to the wall as an individual print on paper. This results in a collage that transfers two rooms from Dresden to Salzburg. Gaenssler’s method of scanning a location image by image and reinstalling this scan in another location generates an irritating impression with distortions, and this is intensified even more by the prolific detail. Gaenssler’s work can be linked to two phenomena in the history of art: the fragmentation and faceting of reality visualised by cubism in the early twentieth century, and the polyperspectives – popularised especially through nineteenth-century panoramas – of a work of art which in its creation and perception was not executed according to central perspective.

Tableau, Katharina Mayer, 2013, C-prints/Diasec, Courtesy: Galerie Lausberg, DĂĽsseldorf
Tableau, Katharina Mayer, 2013, C-prints/Diasec, Courtesy: Galerie Lausberg, DüsseldorfKlicken um Bild zu vergrößern

Katharina Mayer

In reaction to the Dresden Sculpture Collection, Katharina Mayer developed a compilation of 21 photographs that turn out to be a composition formed from her finding of personal images (Bildfindung). The word finding (Findung) has a double meaning: firstly, it stands for a form of discovery and observation and reveals the artist’s sensitive response to the Sculpture Collection. Secondly, it has the inherent sense of invention (Erfindung) and thus describes Mayer’s tendency to create a scenario with her images. Katharina Mayer’s contribution encapsulates both approaches in a tableau of photographs that – with the inclusion of earlier photos – tell of the artist’s relationship to the art-historical atmosphere in the Sculpture Collection. The museum – in its architecture and exhibits – provides the setting for a world of pictures in which the artist transposes multiple references to the history of art into photography. The result establishes a relationship to the institution of the Sculpture Collection and to the history of art narrated within it since the nineteenth century, and continued today. Thus Katharina Mayer develops her own dramaturgy and uses the Sculpture Collection for creating images of her mood in the depots, exhibition galleries, offices, halls and rooms of the Albertinum.

 

  

Rodenner, Lois Renner, 2012/13 C-print/Diasec, Lois Renner, Vienna
Rodenner, Lois Renner, 2012/13 C-print/Diasec, Lois Renner, ViennaKlicken um Bild zu vergrößern

Lois Renner

Lois Renner’s photographs are the result of his period of work in the Dresden Sculpture Collection, where for about two weeks he guested with his own Atelier. The Atelier is an exact model of his studio on Schönbrunnerstraße in Vienna. The model, about five metres long, was cut up for “de sculptura”, placed on rollers, and transported to Dresden. Thus Renner was able to move it around the Sculpture Collection and place it in variable vantage points in relation to architecture and objects. The model acts as an experimental field into which he incorporates, inter alia, (real) things and objects he scales down himself, works of art history as reproductions or miniatures, also his own works. By means of inner and outer views, Lois Renner creates very special links between the model and its surroundings. He composes images in which art-historical and personal levels dovetail with the Sculpture Collection. What is so special about the new pictures is the opportunity of working with outstanding original works. The “Thinker” by Auguste Rodin seems to be casting a glance into Renner’s Atelier – in effect, this fulfils Renner’s aim of paying homage to works and personalities in the history of art by “portraying sculpture through the medium of photography in such a way that painting is the result”.

 

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